Are You Ready For College?

ready-for-college

ADHD 
and
 college: a
 challenge
 you
 can
 handle

Do 
you
 get
 an
 anxious 
feeling
 when
 you
 think
 about 
school? Going
 to
 college is
 an
adjustment
 for 
anyone,
 but
 when
 you
 have 
ADHD,
 the
 challenges 
are
 that
 much
 greater.
However, 
college
 is
 a
 challenge
 you
 can 
handle
 if
 you
 go
 armed 
with
 the
 knowledge 
of 
a 
few 
extra 
things you 
can
 do to 
make 
sure
 your
 college
 experience 
is
 everything
 you
 hope
 it
will
 be.

Do
 you
 have
 the
 4
 student
 qualities
 for
 success?

Successful
 students
 usually
 have
 four
 qualities
 that 
help
 them
 achieve
 their
 goals:

1. Sticking 
with
 things even
 when
 the
 going 
gets
 tough
 ( a.k.a.
 perseverance),

2. Ability
 to
 delay 
gratification
 and
 focus 
on
 the
 big 
picture,

3. Time 
management 
and
 organizational
 skills,
 and

4. Striking
 the
 right
 balance
 between
 fun 
and
 work.

Are
 you
 feeling
 discouraged
 already? No
 surprise. These
 particular skills
 don’t
 come
 easily
to
 students with 
ADHD. Organizational
 problems, 
impulsivity
 and
 time
 management
 issues 
are
 actually
 the
 hallmarks 
of 
living 
with 
ADHD. You
 think,
 “If 
I 
just
 get
 this
 special
 planner,
 I’ll 
never 
forget 
anything
 again.” Or 
you 
promise
 yourself,
 “Next 
time
 I’m
 going
to
 start 
working
 on
 my
 class
 reading
 at
 the
 beginning
 of
 the 
term
 instead
 of 
cramming
right
 before
 finals.” It’s
so
 easy
 to
 think,
“If
 I 
just 
make
 myself
 do
 this…
it’ll
 be
 fine.” 
But
what 
if
  we 
told
 you
 that 
making
 yourself 
do
 it 
is 
the 
totally  wrong 
approach?

Read more at: Your guide for college success

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Information for Parents seeking and ADHD coach

Information for Parents seeking and ADHD coach

 

ADHD Study Tips Staying on top: Final Exam Study Tips for ADHD students

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Are you gearing up for finals?  Can’t wait for it all to be over?  Does this sound like you?  “I know I shouldn’t wait until the last minute and pull an all-nighter.  My work isn’t the best it could be, but it’s the only way I can get motivated.”

Getting back on track:

You can still get yourself back on track, even with a few days left.  And here’s how.

Assess your time:

  • Make a calendar.  Get some paper, open up a spread sheet, or set up a Google calendar.
  • Sketch out a calendar for the upcoming days remaining in the school year. Block out both the days and leave space for the hours of the day.  Here’s a weekly planner to give you an idea of what it might look like. (You can also download and print it.)
  • Block out on your calendar plan all your classes and other critical time commitments (ex. job, sports — things you MUST do).
  • Block out when you’ll be sleeping and eating.
  • On the second page, list all the other things you have to get done.

Prioritize:

  • Circle the items that have big consequences for not getting them done.
  • Everything else is lower priority right now. You can even let them fall off the list for now.

Break your project into smaller bits:

  • Identify all the steps you need to do to get a big project done.  For a paper, for instance, you need time to do research, brainstorm and/or write a draft, write the final draft, and hand it in.
  • Block of time on your calendar for each of those steps.
  • If it looks like you have extra hours left on your calendar plan, look to the next higher priority tasks and start scheduling them until you run out of hours in the day.
  • Don’t forget to schedule some short breaks along the way.

Stick to your plan!

  • Keep the plan with you 24/7. Put it in your agenda, or your phone.
  • Keep checking your plan.  Stick to it to the best of your ability. If it’s 1:00 pm and your plan says you should be done with lunch and working on the draft, go work on the draft.
  • Remember, it is an emergency plan to get you through a tough spot. One way or another, it will be over soon.

How an ADHD Coach can help

  • If you find yourself in a last minute study crunch so much of the time it feels like a habit, and ADHD coach can help you avoid emergency situations in the first place.
  • One of the characteristics of ADHD is a tendency to shoot from the hip, or the “ready, fire, aim” syndrome. A coach works with you over time to develop better planning and self-management skills; skills that will help you manage your time and your things so you’re on top of your work and the rest of your life and not overwhelmed and behind all the time.
  • Once you’ve met your deadline, get yourself a coach. By working with a coach, you can stay on top of your work and have fun too!

ADHD College Survival Tips | Edge Coaching

Survival Tips for College Students with ADHD

By Robert Tudisco, Edge Foundation Executive Director

I wish I knew back in college what I know now about living with ADHD.  I had to learn ways to cope the hard way because I wasn’t diagnosed until many years after I completed school.  Since my diagnosis I’ve developed many skills that have made a huge difference in my life.  Here are four survival skills I’ve discovered that any college student with ADHD can use to make college more productive and stress free.

READING COMPREHENSION

Many of my prelaw classes had heavy reading requirements that pushed my ADHD brain to its limit.  I tried everything I could think of to stay focused, but my mind always wandered and I struggled with comprehension and staying on task.

Then in senior year, a friend of mine who worked in an accounting firm mentioned that her firm routinely handed out foam earplugs for reading tax code.  The text was very boring and she said that it helped her stay focused.  I immediately went to the store and bought some.

When I inserted the earplugs into my ears, it was like shutting off the world so I could actually climb into what I was reading.  The effect was amazing.  Those small inexpensive foam earplugs got me through the rest of college, law schooland the bar exam.

After law school, an office setting presented a new challenge:  I couldn’t just shut it off.  Phones were ringing, people asked questions and my earplugs were of little use.  I experimented with sound machines and music to filter out distractions.  After much trial and error, I determined that classical and guitar music struck the balance that I was looking for.

The important thing to note is that I didn’t give up.  I thought about my focus challenge.  I tried – failed – and tried again.  My thought process and commitment made all the difference.

OUTLINING

 

Another useful tool I use that also helps with procrastination is outlining.  If, like me, you’ve tried and given up on lists because they are long and intimidating, give outlining a try.  Outlines help me understand how each task is connected and provides me with a map for getting there.  I outline everything that I do, from articles to case briefs to scheduling my day.

  • An outline provides the structure my ADHD craves for whatever project or time frame that I need to plan.
  • An outline provides a hierarchy of concepts and shows how they are related to each other.
  • An outline breaks down projects to smaller subprojects and thereby makes them less intimidating.  Often the hardest part of task is getting started.  Breaking the project into the smallest components makes this much easier.

EXERCISE

 

After my diagnosis with ADHD, I went back and looked at my school transcripts and tried to correlate the times that I got the best grades with what was going on outside of school.  I quickly saw a pattern.  During the times when my grades were highest in college and law school, I was running to relieve my stress.

After this realization I embraced running and made it a part of my life.  I regularly run 4 to 5 days per week for approximately an hour.  My running helps me organize my thoughts and plan out how I am going to approach situations.

In recent years, research has shown that exercise can help reduce the symptoms of ADHD, anxiety, depression and other disorders.  Integrate exercise into your daily life.  If you keep at it, you’ll find it centers you, reduces your stress and brings you the clarity you need to move forward.

COACHING

 

One of the most important things that I have discovered in my journey to work with my ADHD is I need help to establish the structure, support and accountability that my ADHD mind so desperately needs.  That’s why I have worked with many different ADHD coaches since my diagnosis.

ADHD coaches offer an objective perspective on the challenges of ADHD.  They help us recognize and develop our talents, and learn where and why we struggle.  Each of my coaches has made a huge difference in how I approach obstacles while building my confidence about the specific talents that I have.

College is a key time to learn skills to work with your ADHD because it is much less structured than high school – especially for those students living away from home for the first time.  You may not have even realized all of the daily support your parents were providing until you are in over your head freshman year.  Even students who are extremely intelligent are at high risk because college requires new levels of self imposed structure and accountability.

An ADHD coach who specializes in the needs of high school and college students can provide the structure, support and accountability you need, not just to survive in college, but to reach your full potential throughout your life.

YOU CAN OVERCOME THE OBSTACLES OF ADHD

 

As someone with ADHD who has struggled all of his life with the challenges it has provided, I am living proof that there are ways to successfully address these obstacles.  The key is to understand yourself, be willing to try new things, reflect about how you respond to situations and don’t be afraid to ask for help.

Keep that perspective and you will learn to gravitate toward your strengths and to avoid your weaknesses.  And always remember you are not alone.  There are a lot of us out there just like you.  Good luck!

 

http://ow.ly/xJGX0

 

Learn more about Edge Foundation here

Parents of Special Needs Kids Benefit from Training & Support

By Edge Coach, Elaine Taylor-Klaus, CPCC, ACC 

take care of yourself first adhdWe all know it takes a village to raise a child. Can you imagine trying to raise your child without one? As parents, we understand the give and take of having a local support network. “Can you pick up this child for me?” “Can I drop that off for you on my way home?” It’s like a dance. We know what it means to ask for help, and rely on each other.

The importance of a village takes on all new meaning – and can be harder to come by – when you have kids with complex needs like ADHD. Sometimes, you’re lucky, and your network embraces your child’s differences. You feel understood and supported.

But sometimes – all too often – your village doesn’t quite know what to do with your child, or with you. You find yourself bouncing from village to village, or sitting on the outside, looking for a place to belong, to fit in. Looking for a place for your child to feel understood, empowered or cherished.

For the first 10 years of my life as a parent, I was a village hopper. Some were more supportive than others, but none lasted very long. I wanted other parents and schools to understand my complex children; but, truth be told, I didn’t really understand them that well, myself.

I mean, I thought I did. But I didn’t fully grasp the extent of what I needed to do, as a parent, to effectively support my children – to set them up for a lifetime of success.

Now don’t get me wrong. I was dutifully “treating” my children’s challenges with therapies and special programs. I was trying everything I could think of to help them, building scaffolding all over the place to support my kids.

But the biggest change happened for my family when I accidentally learned the greatest secret of effective parenting:

The changes my kids needed most started with me!

Everything shifted when I started to create some scaffolding for myself – to get some help for me.

And I don’t mean 5-10 minute conversations with my child’s therapists at the end of her sessions. I mean clear, direct support and training for myself.

It turns out, I had to learn to really understand the challenges my children were facing, and get strategies for coping and communicating more effectively – with everyone! I had to shift my approach to raising children with complex needs.

What I never expected, less than a year into my journey, was that my 9 year old child, with Dyslexia, anxiety & ADHD, would be clear enough to say: “Thank you, mommy. Things are so much better around here.” I kid you not! As I learned new skills, I became a much better parent. And it wasn’t rocket science. It was a solid combination of education & communication that made a world of difference!

I wish I could tell you that in 1 year I turned my entire family around. Or that my husband immediately saw the wisdom of all that I was bringing to the family, and jumped right on the back of my band-wagon. Not so much. At least, not right away.

The truth is, it took him a while. He was quite comfortable denying that ADHD (including his own) was largely responsible for the challenges we were facing. He started changing his attitude when he couldn’t deny, anymore, what a difference my approach was making in our kids’ lives.

I can’t tell you when it changed, precisely, but I can tell you this: all it takes is one parent to begin to turn the ship!  And while it’s much easier when you’re both on board the same ship – or even in the same harbor – it’s actually not critical. One parent can save the life of a child with ADHD. One parent can turn the tides.

 That one parent can be you.

And most of us need support in order to do it.  Whatever else you believe about your “reality” right now – you might think it’s too late, or you need your spouse on board, or there’s just not enough money, or you’re not sure what to do or try –the choice is up to you!

If you make a commitment to get the support you need – to get training along with coaching or therapy, or whatever else it is you think you need – then you can make real change for your family! Things will improve, dramatically, when you invest in yourself for the good of your child.

Your child’s future is a wondrous world of opportunity. What village do you need – does your child need for you to have – to set her up for success? What are you doing now to assure him independence later on?

We’ve created a unique “cyber-village” at ImpactADHD.com for parents like us, parent like you, who want their kids to thrive, and aren’t always so sure what they need to do to help make that happen. It’s given us, and thousands of others like us a safe, a solid place to help our kids become the adults we know they can become.

But if you don’t get help with us – we urge you – for the sake of your child, your family, and yourself — get help somewhere. There is no need for you to wander, lost and alone. FIND the village that understands and will support you and your family. And take advantage of that incredible give-and-take that happens when we parents lean on each other.

 

Elaine Taylor-Klaus, CPCC, ACC is the co-founder of ImpactADHD.com, dedicated to helping parents all over the world raise confident, successful children with ADD/ADHD. ImpactADHD programs are offered online and on the phone so that all parents can access critical support. A writer, parenting coach and public speaker, Elaine is an advocate and trainer for parents of children with “complex” needs. A national expert for the Making Moments education campaign for parents, Elaine is first and foremost the mother of 3 complex children in an ADHD Family of 5.

 

Don’t miss out! Wouldn’t it be great if you could …? • Finish a term paper without pulling an all-nighter • Arrive at work on time, all the time • Stick to your workout schedule • Turn on your computer and get to work work instead of getting lost on Facebook or SnapChat