Executive Function Coaching Saves Lives

Here’s is a recent report from Executive Function Coach and Trainer Erin Wilson:

“It was a Friday–I had just gotten home from school, the Seattle summer had started early, and I was exhausted. I was getting a popsicle out of the freezer and beginning to settle down when my phone rang. It was a number I didn’t recognize, but I had broken the rule of not giving my phone number out to students; so, student was my guess. I thought about ignoring it—Oh, come on! It’s Friday evening!—but I hit the green button anyway.

“It was one of my 17-year-old students who immediately started apologizing for bothering me, and talking of hanging up, but I kept him on the line. ‘No, I’m here. What’s going on?’ I asked.”

‘Well, I am on the Aurora Bridge and getting ready to jump, but I knew you would be mad at me if I didn’t talk to you before I jumped.’

‘Oh, gosh, Malcolm. Yes, indeed. Thank you for calling. I am here. Let’s figure this out together.’

A conversation ensued, at the end of which they agreed to go for milkshakes. She drove to the bridge and picked him up. Malcolm is still with us.

As unique as this conversation was, it is also typical. Malcolm meets with Erin once a week for executive function coaching. Erin mostly just asks questions: “What’s going on?” “How was your week?” How are you doing on your goal?” “What is your strategy?” “How is that working for you?” “What did you learn from that?” “What can you do differently?”

As unique as Malcolm’s problem is, it is also typical. So many kids in our schools are problems, or cause problems, feel they have a problem, told they have a problem. What was Malcolm’s problem? Was it dyslexia or ADHD? Was he a victim of high stress in the home or the neighborhood? Was he being bullied? Was it “Executive Function Disorder?” Suggest your favorite dysfunction.

Notice what bad habits we are in! It doesn’t really matter what “problem” he has or what his “learning difference” is, does it? Whatever the problem, he needs a partner who knows how to strengthen his executive function. Does he need better planning skills? Whatever. Whatever the matter is, he needs practice in owning his own brain, so he can own his own decisions, so he can own his own life.

What saved Malcolm’s life was not Erin’s personality, but a person who was trained to do what few people in schools are in the habit of doing: talking to students as if they are decision makers, as if they want to make a difference, as if they are leading their own lives. Each of us needs another person who acts as if the only thing that matters right now is the choices I make, and knows how to help me figure out the good ones.

Is any work in a school more important than this? How many “at risk” kids would be “at risk” if school were a place for learning to think? What would happen to our graduation rates if school focused everyone on maximizing internally motivated decision-making?


About the Author

Rick Ackerly is a nationally recognized educator, speaker and leadership coach with more than 40 years of experience in schools, 35 as head of school. He is the author of The Genius in Every Child: Encouraging Character, Curiosity and Creativity in Children. His blog is www.geniusinchildren.org.

Apps for Students with Learning & Attention Issues

kids-using-tablet-computersIn today’s world, apps are indispensable. They give us directions to keep us from getting lost, allow us to manage our money, and a hundred other daily tasks. So it is no surprise that apps have been created for helping students, especially those with learning and attention challenges such as ADHD, to organize and perform tasks more effectively. Apps, in combination with treatment modalities and coaching support, are empowering these students to perform at a higher level than they might otherwise.

Distributed Cognition

Brock Eide, M.D., and Fernette Eide, M.D. discuss an interesting idea called “distributed cognition.” It has emerged as educational researchers rethink the concept of intelligence. Traditionally, intelligence has been measured by our ability to remember and regurgitate something we have studied. The Eides define distributed cognition in their article “A New View of ‘Smart’ for Kids With Learning and Attention Issues.”

One helpful idea is called distributed cognition. That term is a mouthful, but the concept is simple.

Cognition means how your brain knows and understands thingsDistributed means shared. So distributed cognition is what you can know and understand if your brain cooperates with outside helpers—whether they’re tools, printed information or other people.

It also means that your intelligence isn’t fixed by the information you carry around in your head. Intelligence can be increased by the way you interact with your environment.

In other words, how “smart” you are is really the sum of two things: The first is what you know on your own. The second is what you can easily learn by interacting with the things you have easy access to.

Apps, search engines and other software tools assist students with learning and attention issues by freeing them of the necessity for memorization which is difficult. Apps can be especially useful in memory intensive areas such as:

  • Procedures, especially multi-step instructions for how to do things
  • Rote facts, like times tables, state capitals or the lists of chemical elements in the periodic table

Apps Aplenty

There are dozens of apps to help students and adults with learning and attention issues, and more coming to market each year.  Understood.org provides an excellent survey of apps for students of all ages.  For example, the Voice Dream Reader helps students with reading issues: it is a customizable app that lets kids highlight text and have it read aloud to them. Healthline also publishes a regular survey of apps for people with ADHD.  Below are demonstrations of some apps for users with ADHD.

Traxion is a mobile app aimed at helping those with ADHD organize your time and time tasks more effectively.

The Social Navigator helps children and teens with social and behavior issues learn to cope more effectively in various social situations.

Time to Rethink Our Educational Model?

As software becomes more deeply embedded into our world, it brings greater urgency to the work of updating our traditional educational model to match what we encounter in life. Distributed cognition is a way of life now outside of the classroom. Most adults would find it hard to navigate the complexities of modern life without Google and smartphone apps. In school, these technologies can be a great leveler for kids struggling with learning and attention issues.

Webinar: Behind The Wheel With ADHD

Edge Foundation is excited to be able to bring you a new training webinar program called “Behind the Wheel With ADHD”, created and developed by Gayle Sweeney and Ann Shanahan. This program was originally designed for driver education professionals and modified for this webinar to allow parents, coaches, and other professionals working with novice teen drivers who struggle with ADHD and other executive functioning challenges to gain from their expertise and knowledge. Gayle and Ann want to bring this information to those in the Edge community who are interested in helping create an enhanced driver training experience for their teens or clients or loved ones.

What is “Behind The Wheel With ADHD”?

Have you heard the studies that show that teen drivers with ADHD are four times more likely to be in a car accident than their peers who do not struggle with executive-function impairments?

Would you appreciate some guidance from the experts on training and coaching teens with ADHD? If so then this program may be one way to help your students mitigate those risks and improve the likelihood of a successful training experience for your teens who struggle with attention deficits and learning challenges.

Human factors are considered to be the most common cause of automobile accidents with in-vehicle distraction identified as a significant contributor to traffic collisions. Any disorder that impairs attention elevates the risk for crashes and other serious incidents on the road. Automobile accidents are more common among those with ADHD and are usually associated with a higher rate of fatality. . Compared to other teens, young drivers with ADHD are two to four times more likely to have traffic accidents, three times as likely to have injuries, four times as likely to be at fault, and six to eight times more likely to have their licenses suspended. Many of the symptoms associated with ADHD are known to magnify driving risks, especially impulsivity, distractibility, inattention, excessive anger, aggression, and risky maneuvers.

What Does “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Offer?

“Behind the Wheel with ADHD” gives you the tools necessary to coach your ADHD teens in creating effective strategies and skills to manage the risks associated with all executive functioning challenges and driving:

• Learn how to implement specific strategies to create a safer trip on the road for the teenage driver with attention deficits or other executive functioning challenges.

• Leave the training with a new set of tools to support the teen driver as he or she learns to drive and manage distractions, impulsivity, and other impediments to safe driving.

• Benefit from the research done on how drivers with ADHD and other executive functioning challenges can create a set of routines that eliminate many of the risky behaviors associated with ADHD and driving.

• Use the tools necessary to start a Graduated License Plan immediately for the new driver based on the prototype developed by Dr. Russell Barkley as well as templates for one’s own enhanced Driver Log, Parent-Teen Agreement, and information about the new app available for iPhones and Androids for the recommended Pre-Trip Inspection for drivers who struggle with executive functioning challenges.

• Learn the impact medication has on the effectiveness of a teen’s driving and some specific ways one can help him or her manage the medication protocol to mitigate risks.

When is “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Offered?

Webinar Dates: Two Wednesdays in September:
September 23: Noon- 1:30 pm Pacific; 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm Eastern
September 30: 4:00 pm- 5:30 pm Pacific; 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm Eastern

What does “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Cost?

Fee: US $75 for 90 minute webinar, use the button below to pay and register.

Choose a date
September 23rd
September 30th
Enter your phone number

How to Sign up for “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Webinar?

To Sign Up: https://edgefoundation.org/parents/webinars.
Questions: Contact Denise von Pressentin at Edge Foundation at 206.632.9497 or at dvonpressentin@edgefoundation.org.

Who are the “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Trainers?

Gayle Sweeney and Ann Shanahan are ADHD and Executive Functioning Coaches who specialize in working with teens, college students, and young adults who have ADHD and other executive functioning issues to help them set goals and create strategies to achieve them. . As co-creators and authors of the new program “Behind the Wheel With ADHD”, Gayle and Ann hope to share their passion for helping people focus on specific strengths and weaknesses in a remarkably tailored driver education experience.

tn(1)Gayle Sweeney is a graduate from Marquette University in Business and trained at with JST Coach Training, LLC, and received training in the Coach Mentor Training Program and earned a Certificate for Advanced Coaching Skills Practicum. Gayle enjoyed a successful career in commercial real estate in Chicago with CB Commercial (now CB Richard Ellis) and then chose to stay home to raise her four children before embarking on a coaching career.

ann-sAnn Shanahan is a graduate in Psychology and Education from North Central College. She began her career as a UPS driver and was quickly was promoted into the management ranks becoming one of the first female Managers of the brown package car drivers in the North Illinois neighborhood districts. She became the North Illinois Safety Manager, responsible for the UPS training and development fleet of drivers. She has two children in college.

Gayle and Ann were trained and certified in 2014 in the Rush Neurobehavioral Center Executive Function Skills Program© taught by Rush University Medical Center. Gayle and Ann presented “Special Risks Associated with the ADHD Driver” to the Illinois Driver Educators Association (IDEA), November 2013.

To learn more about Gayle and Ann’s ADHD coaching practice, visit their website: www.BehindtheWheelWithADHD.com

behind-the-wheel-logo

Webinar: Behind the Wheel With ADHD

Edge Foundation is excited to be able to bring you a new training webinar program called “Behind the Wheel With ADHD”, created and developed by Gayle Sweeney and Ann Shanahan. This program was originally designed for driver education professionals and modified for this webinar to allow parents, coaches, and other professionals working with novice teen drivers who struggle with ADHD and other executive functioning challenges to gain from their expertise and knowledge. Gayle and Ann want to bring this information to those in the Edge community who are interested in helping create an enhanced driver training experience for their teens or clients or loved ones.

What is “Behind The Wheel With ADHD”?

Have you heard the studies that show that teen drivers with ADHD are four times more likely to be in a car accident than their peers who do not struggle with executive-function impairments?

Would you appreciate some guidance from the experts on training and coaching teens with ADHD? If so then this program may be one way to help your students mitigate those risks and improve the likelihood of a successful training experience for your teens who struggle with attention deficits and learning challenges.

Human factors are considered to be the most common cause of automobile accidents with in-vehicle distraction identified as a significant contributor to traffic collisions. Any disorder that impairs attention elevates the risk for crashes and other serious incidents on the road. Automobile accidents are more common among those with ADHD and are usually associated with a higher rate of fatality. . Compared to other teens, young drivers with ADHD are two to four times more likely to have traffic accidents, three times as likely to have injuries, four times as likely to be at fault, and six to eight times more likely to have their licenses suspended. Many of the symptoms associated with ADHD are known to magnify driving risks, especially impulsivity, distractibility, inattention, excessive anger, aggression, and risky maneuvers.

What Does “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Offer?

“Behind the Wheel with ADHD” gives you the tools necessary to coach your ADHD teens in creating effective strategies and skills to manage the risks associated with all executive functioning challenges and driving:

• Learn how to implement specific strategies to create a safer trip on the road for the teenage driver with attention deficits or other executive functioning challenges.

• Leave the training with a new set of tools to support the teen driver as he or she learns to drive and manage distractions, impulsivity, and other impediments to safe driving.

• Benefit from the research done on how drivers with ADHD and other executive functioning challenges can create a set of routines that eliminate many of the risky behaviors associated with ADHD and driving.

• Use the tools necessary to start a Graduated License Plan immediately for the new driver based on the prototype developed by Dr. Russell Barkley as well as templates for one’s own enhanced Driver Log, Parent-Teen Agreement, and information about the new app available for iPhones and Androids for the recommended Pre-Trip Inspection for drivers who struggle with executive functioning challenges.

• Learn the impact medication has on the effectiveness of a teen’s driving and some specific ways one can help him or her manage the medication protocol to mitigate risks.

When is “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Offered?

Webinar Dates: Two Wednesdays in September:
September 23: Noon- 1:30 pm Pacific; 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm Eastern
September 30: 4:00 pm- 5:30 pm Pacific; 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm Eastern

What does “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Cost?

Fee: US $75 for 90 minute webinar, use the button below to pay and register.

Choose a date
September 23rd 
September 30th 
Enter your phone number

How to Sign up for “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Webinar?

To Sign Up: https://edgefoundation.org/parents/webinars.
Questions: Contact Denise von Pressentin at Edge Foundation at 206.632.9497 or at dvonpressentin@edgefoundation.org.

Who are the “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Trainers?

Gayle Sweeney and Ann Shanahan are ADHD and Executive Functioning Coaches who specialize in working with teens, college students, and young adults who have ADHD and other executive functioning issues to help them set goals and create strategies to achieve them. . As co-creators and authors of the new program “Behind the Wheel With ADHD”, Gayle and Ann hope to share their passion for helping people focus on specific strengths and weaknesses in a remarkably tailored driver education experience.

tn(1)Gayle Sweeney is a graduate from Marquette University in Business and trained at with JST Coach Training, LLC, and received training in the Coach Mentor Training Program and earned a Certificate for Advanced Coaching Skills Practicum. Gayle enjoyed a successful career in commercial real estate in Chicago with CB Commercial (now CB Richard Ellis) and then chose to stay home to raise her four children before embarking on a coaching career.

ann-sAnn Shanahan is a graduate in Psychology and Education from North Central College. She began her career as a UPS driver and was quickly was promoted into the management ranks becoming one of the first female Managers of the brown package car drivers in the North Illinois neighborhood districts. She became the North Illinois Safety Manager, responsible for the UPS training and development fleet of drivers. She has two children in college.

Gayle and Ann were trained and certified in 2014 in the Rush Neurobehavioral Center Executive Function Skills Program© taught by Rush University Medical Center. Gayle and Ann presented “Special Risks Associated with the ADHD Driver” to the Illinois Driver Educators Association (IDEA), November 2013.

To learn more about Gayle and Ann’s ADHD coaching practice, visit their website: www.BehindtheWheelWithADHD.com

behind-the-wheel-logo

Behind the Wheel With ADHD

Edge Foundation is excited to be able to bring you a new training webinar program called “Behind the Wheel With ADHD”, created and developed by Gayle Sweeney and Ann Shanahan. This program was originally designed for driver education professionals and modified for this webinar to allow parents, coaches, and other professionals working with novice teen drivers who struggle with ADHD and other executive functioning challenges to gain from their expertise and knowledge. Gayle and Ann want to bring this information to those in the Edge community who are interested in helping create an enhanced driver training experience for their teens or clients or loved ones.

What is “Behind The Wheel With ADHD”?

Have you heard the studies that show that teen drivers with ADHD are four times more likely to be in a car accident than their peers who do not struggle with executive-function impairments?

Would you appreciate some guidance from the experts on training and coaching teens with ADHD? If so then this program may be one way to help your students mitigate those risks and improve the likelihood of a successful training experience for your teens who struggle with attention deficits and learning challenges.

Human factors are considered to be the most common cause of automobile accidents with in-vehicle distraction identified as a significant contributor to traffic collisions. Any disorder that impairs attention elevates the risk for crashes and other serious incidents on the road. Automobile accidents are more common among those with ADHD and are usually associated with a higher rate of fatality. . Compared to other teens, young drivers with ADHD are two to four times more likely to have traffic accidents, three times as likely to have injuries, four times as likely to be at fault, and six to eight times more likely to have their licenses suspended. Many of the symptoms associated with ADHD are known to magnify driving risks, especially impulsivity, distractibility, inattention, excessive anger, aggression, and risky maneuvers.

What Does “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Offer?

“Behind the Wheel with ADHD” gives you the tools necessary to coach your ADHD teens in creating effective strategies and skills to manage the risks associated with all executive functioning challenges and driving:

• Learn how to implement specific strategies to create a safer trip on the road for the teenage driver with attention deficits or other executive functioning challenges.

• Leave the training with a new set of tools to support the teen driver as he or she learns to drive and manage distractions, impulsivity, and other impediments to safe driving.

• Benefit from the research done on how drivers with ADHD and other executive functioning challenges can create a set of routines that eliminate many of the risky behaviors associated with ADHD and driving.

• Use the tools necessary to start a Graduated License Plan immediately for the new driver based on the prototype developed by Dr. Russell Barkley as well as templates for one’s own enhanced Driver Log, Parent-Teen Agreement, and information about the new app available for iPhones and Androids for the recommended Pre-Trip Inspection for drivers who struggle with executive functioning challenges.

• Learn the impact medication has on the effectiveness of a teen’s driving and some specific ways one can help him or her manage the medication protocol to mitigate risks.

When is “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Offered?

Webinar Dates: Two Wednesdays in September:
September 23: Noon- 1:30 pm Pacific; 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm Eastern
September 30: 4:00 pm- 5:30 pm Pacific; 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm Eastern

What does “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Cost?

Fee: US $75 for 90 minute webinar, use the button below to pay and register.

Choose a date
September 23rd 
September 30th 
Enter your phone number

How to Sign up for “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Webinar?

To Sign Up: https://edgefoundation.org/parents/webinars.
Questions: Contact Denise von Pressentin at Edge Foundation at 206.632.9497 or at dvonpressentin@edgefoundation.org.

Who are the “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Trainers?

Gayle Sweeney and Ann Shanahan are ADHD and Executive Functioning Coaches who specialize in working with teens, college students, and young adults who have ADHD and other executive functioning issues to help them set goals and create strategies to achieve them. . As co-creators and authors of the new program “Behind the Wheel With ADHD”, Gayle and Ann hope to share their passion for helping people focus on specific strengths and weaknesses in a remarkably tailored driver education experience.

tn(1)Gayle Sweeney is a graduate from Marquette University in Business and trained at with JST Coach Training, LLC, and received training in the Coach Mentor Training Program and earned a Certificate for Advanced Coaching Skills Practicum. Gayle enjoyed a successful career in commercial real estate in Chicago with CB Commercial (now CB Richard Ellis) and then chose to stay home to raise her four children before embarking on a coaching career.

ann-sAnn Shanahan is a graduate in Psychology and Education from North Central College. She began her career as a UPS driver and was quickly was promoted into the management ranks becoming one of the first female Managers of the brown package car drivers in the North Illinois neighborhood districts. She became the North Illinois Safety Manager, responsible for the UPS training and development fleet of drivers. She has two children in college.

Gayle and Ann were trained and certified in 2014 in the Rush Neurobehavioral Center Executive Function Skills Program© taught by Rush University Medical Center. Gayle and Ann presented “Special Risks Associated with the ADHD Driver” to the Illinois Driver Educators Association (IDEA), November 2013.

To learn more about Gayle and Ann’s ADHD coaching practice, visit their website: www.BehindtheWheelWithADHD.com

behind-the-wheel-logo

“Behind The Wheel With ADHD”

Edge Foundation is excited to be able to bring you a new training webinar program called “Behind the Wheel With ADHD”, created and developed by Gayle Sweeney and Ann Shanahan. This program was originally designed for driver education professionals and modified for this webinar to allow parents, coaches, and other professionals working with novice teen drivers who struggle with ADHD and other executive functioning challenges to gain from their expertise and knowledge. Gayle and Ann want to bring this information to those in the Edge community who are interested in helping create an enhanced driver training experience for their teens or clients or loved ones.

What is “Behind The Wheel With ADHD”?

Have you heard the studies that show that teen drivers with ADHD are four times more likely to be in a car accident than their peers who do not struggle with executive-function impairments?

Would you appreciate some guidance from the experts on training and coaching teens with ADHD? If so then this program may be one way to help your students mitigate those risks and improve the likelihood of a successful training experience for your teens who struggle with attention deficits and learning challenges.

Human factors are considered to be the most common cause of automobile accidents with in-vehicle distraction identified as a significant contributor to traffic collisions. Any disorder that impairs attention elevates the risk for crashes and other serious incidents on the road. Automobile accidents are more common among those with ADHD and are usually associated with a higher rate of fatality. . Compared to other teens, young drivers with ADHD are two to four times more likely to have traffic accidents, three times as likely to have injuries, four times as likely to be at fault, and six to eight times more likely to have their licenses suspended. Many of the symptoms associated with ADHD are known to magnify driving risks, especially impulsivity, distractibility, inattention, excessive anger, aggression, and risky maneuvers.

What Does “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Offer?

“Behind the Wheel with ADHD” gives you the tools necessary to coach your ADHD teens in creating effective strategies and skills to manage the risks associated with all executive functioning challenges and driving:

• Learn how to implement specific strategies to create a safer trip on the road for the teenage driver with attention deficits or other executive functioning challenges.

• Leave the training with a new set of tools to support the teen driver as he or she learns to drive and manage distractions, impulsivity, and other impediments to safe driving.

• Benefit from the research done on how drivers with ADHD and other executive functioning challenges can create a set of routines that eliminate many of the risky behaviors associated with ADHD and driving.

• Use the tools necessary to start a Graduated License Plan immediately for the new driver based on the prototype developed by Dr. Russell Barkley as well as templates for one’s own enhanced Driver Log, Parent-Teen Agreement, and information about the new app available for iPhones and Androids for the recommended Pre-Trip Inspection for drivers who struggle with executive functioning challenges.

• Learn the impact medication has on the effectiveness of a teen’s driving and some specific ways one can help him or her manage the medication protocol to mitigate risks.

When is “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Offered?

Webinar Dates: Two Wednesdays in September:
September 23: Noon- 1:30 pm Pacific; 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm Eastern
September 30: 4:00 pm- 5:30 pm Pacific; 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm Eastern

What does “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Cost?

Fee: US $75 for 90 minute webinar, use the button below to pay and register.

Choose a date
September 23rd 
September 30th 
Enter your phone number

How to Sign up for “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Webinar?

To Sign Up: https://edgefoundation.org/parents/webinars.
Questions: Contact Denise von Pressentin at Edge Foundation at 206.632.9497 or at dvonpressentin@edgefoundation.org.

Who are the “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Trainers?

Gayle Sweeney and Ann Shanahan are ADHD and Executive Functioning Coaches who specialize in working with teens, college students, and young adults who have ADHD and other executive functioning issues to help them set goals and create strategies to achieve them. . As co-creators and authors of the new program “Behind the Wheel With ADHD”, Gayle and Ann hope to share their passion for helping people focus on specific strengths and weaknesses in a remarkably tailored driver education experience.

tn(1)Gayle Sweeney is a graduate from Marquette University in Business and trained at with JST Coach Training, LLC, and received training in the Coach Mentor Training Program and earned a Certificate for Advanced Coaching Skills Practicum. Gayle enjoyed a successful career in commercial real estate in Chicago with CB Commercial (now CB Richard Ellis) and then chose to stay home to raise her four children before embarking on a coaching career.

ann-sAnn Shanahan is a graduate in Psychology and Education from North Central College. She began her career as a UPS driver and was quickly was promoted into the management ranks becoming one of the first female Managers of the brown package car drivers in the North Illinois neighborhood districts. She became the North Illinois Safety Manager, responsible for the UPS training and development fleet of drivers. She has two children in college.

Gayle and Ann were trained and certified in 2014 in the Rush Neurobehavioral Center Executive Function Skills Program© taught by Rush University Medical Center. Gayle and Ann presented “Special Risks Associated with the ADHD Driver” to the Illinois Driver Educators Association (IDEA), November 2013.

To learn more about Gayle and Ann’s ADHD coaching practice, visit their website: www.BehindtheWheelWithADHD.com

behind-the-wheel-logo