Two ADHD Resources you must have to survive school/college

ADHD Parent Care Package

Get Our Parent Care Package

Our College Success Guide

Get Our College Guide

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Can you DO more to manage ADHD?

There’s been so much attention the past few  days about whether Ritalin is effective for treating ADHD, you may have missed the news that fidgeting can help manage ADHD.  That’s right, fidgeting actually helps kids with ADHD stay alert.   University of Central Florida  study reportedly shows that ADHD kids move around in order to help them stay focused.  In fact kids with ADHD may actually learn better when they are fidgeting!

Teachers in Minnesota and Wisconsin have been experimenting with flexible desks that allow children the option to either stand or sit at them.  The New York Timesreported that researchers from the University of Minnesota have been studying the impact of these flexible desks on the academic outcomes of children using them.

Finally, a study published in the journal of Applied Cognitive Psychology shows that doodling actually improves your ability to remember details, rather than indicating your mind is wandering.

Here at Edge, we know that fidgeting can be used successfully to help manage ADHD symptoms.  In 2005 our Executive Director, Sarah Wright, co-authored, Fidget to Focus:  Outwit Your Boredom: Sensory Strategies for Living with ADD.  Next month we’ll tell you more about this book that started it all! In the meantime, take a look at these reports – perhaps they’ll give you ideas of things to do at school or work to improve your focus.  An ADHD coach can also help you discover which strategies work best for you.

getsit

Did you already know that fidgeting was a way that helped you focus?  Tell us about it.  We’d love hearing from you about how you keep your edge!

 

Edge Foundation’s FAQ’s

Edge Coaching FAQs

FAQs Overview

Here’s where to get all of your questions about Edge Coaching answered.

  • Getting to know Edge Independent Coaching
  • How to sign up for Edge Coaching
  • Who do Edge Coaches work with?

Getting to know Edge Independent Coaching

What is Edge Coaching?

Everyone knows a coach when they see one. There are football coaches, tennis coaches, dance coaches, voice coaches and executive coaches. And for the daily challenge of life itself there are life coaches. Put simply, a life coach helps people meet the challenges and opportunities life presents. An Edge Coach is a life coach who is specialized in (1) helping young people, who (2) have  unique Executive Functioning challenges such as  ADHD  Edge Coaching works the same way as an athletic coach, only the game is life.

Your Edge Coach will work with you on the skills you may be missing or need to develop more fully.  Over time you will get better at all the things that are hard for you right now — things like planning, prioritizing, time management, and organization. Your Edge Coach will also help you apply these new skills to achieving the things you want most. Check out some of our testimonials to hear how Edge Coaching has helped real students achieve their goals. People all over the world are recognizing the benefits of life coaching in their pursuit of career and life goals. Many CEOs and top business executives find that executive coaches can give them the edge necessary to manage successfully and effectively when the stakes are very high. At the Edge Foundation we believe that if a coach is good enough for CEOs, then it is good enough for our young people.

How does an Edge Coach help?

Coaching is particularly well-suited to helping people with Executive Functioning impairments, like ADHD, live better with the challenges of this disorder. Many of the strategies Edge Coaches offer are precisely the ones that are needed most. When self management, time management, and organization don’t come naturally, an Edge Coach can help you develop these skills. In addition, the focused and personalized one-on-one approach of coaching works really well for young people.  For those diagnosed with the Executive Functioning challenge of ADHD, Edge Coaching is not a substitute for traditional treatment such as medication. But at the Edge Foundation we believe Edge Coaching, regardless of whether the young person is on medication or not, is a critical and highly effective support and strategy for young people to learn to deal well with the Executive Functioning challenges they face.

There are seven major Executive Functioning challenge areas that most Edge Coaches work on with their clients:

  • Scheduling,
  • Goal setting,
  • Confidence building,
  • Organizing,
  • Focusing,
  • Prioritizing, and
  • Persisting at tasks.

Who are our Edge Coaches?

The Edge Foundation has recruited and trained a select group of coaches. Your Edge Coach is an experienced coach who has a real interest in coaching young people.  Our Edge Coaches have been specially trained in working with teens and young adults who have Executive Functioning challenges like ADHD.

What happens in an Edge coaching session?

Getting started:

The Edge Coaching Program starts with a get-to-know you chat. In this call, we’ll answer your questions, get a sense of whether or not you’ll benefit from Edge Coaching and make sure you understand the general terms and conditions of working with an Edge Coach. Once you and your coach have decided to proceed, you sign a contract and begin. These chats are free and take about 20 minutes.

Intake session:

The first session is a lengthy one and is sometimes called the intake session. During this discussion that usually lasts about two hours, you and your coach talk about what’s working and what’s not, what’s frustrating, and where you’d like to see progress. If you are under 18 years of age, your parents will participate in some of it. By the end of this session you and your coach will know what you are going to be working on and how you are going to work on it.

Weekly coaching sessions and check-ins:

After you’ve completed the intake session, you begin your weekly 30-minute coaching sessions.  In addition you will have additional check-ins during the week. Check-ins can be by text, phone, or email.

How to sign up for Edge Coaching

How do I get started?

Learn more

If you want more information or just want to talk it through, either complete the Get More Information Form or call us at 1-888-718-8886.  If we don’t pick up the phone immediately, we will be back in touch with you as soon as possible, and, no case later than the next day.

Involve your parents (or not)

If you are under 18 years of age, your parent will participate in all phases of the application process but you make the final decision when selecting an Edge Coach.  For students 18 years and older, it is expected that you take the initiative for selecting your own coach and your parents take a supportive but secondary role.

Apply for a coach match

When you’re ready to get your own Edge Coach, these are the steps to take:

Step 1: contact Denise, our Edge Coach Match Maker

You can reach her by calling (1-888-718-8886) or emailing (dvonpressentin@edgefoundation.org) or by submitting the form.

Step 2: set up a call between the student/individual to be coached and Denise

Denise, our Edge Coach Match Maker, based upon the discussion she has with the person to be coached, will identify the Edge Coach best suited to work with you and your particular situation.  And don’t worry, you’ll have a chance to get to know the coach and have all your questions answered before you start coaching or make any financial commitment.  The application form below should have been submitted by now.

Step 3: Meet your Edge Coach

After you’ve completed the application, and had your conversations (parent and student) with Denise, our Edge Coach Match Maker, will provide you with a bio for your potential Edge Coach. Your Edge Coach will contact you to set up a time for an interview to determine if it is a good match, a good connection between the Edge Coach and you.  If, after speaking with the proposed Edge Coach, you want to speak with another coach, no problem.  Just contact Denise and she will suggest another Edge Coach.  The process will be repeated until a good match is made for you — one that you and the Edge Coach are excited about and comfortable with.

Begin Edge Coaching

Once an Edge Coach has been selected, you (and your parent if you are under 18) and your coach will sign a month-to-month contract, and coaching commences.

Payment for coaching services is pre-paid monthly and will be made directly to your coach at the beginning of each month.

At any time if there are questions or concerns, Denise, our Coach Match Maker and the coach are available to help you.

What do I need to know to select an Edge Coach?

Coaching is a partnership in which you and your coach define your goals and plan how to achieve those goals. You provide the goals — the coach provides structure, support and accountability. When selecting an Edge Coach look for someone who:

  • Understands the unique challenges you face in your school environment and in your life.
  • Is flexible and one you feel comfortable with (this is not a decision for your parents to make – the coach is working with you!).
  • Offers the option of working by phone/Skype or in person if necessary.
  • Is comfortable working, as needed, in coordination with your therapist, tutor, faculty advisor or other professionals for your best interests.

A good Edge Coach will help you identify and gravitate towards your strengths, while navigating around your weaknesses. Working with the right coach you soon find you’re stronger at advocating for yourself and your stress is dramatically reduced because you are on track and following a plan.

How much does Edge Coaching cost?

By now it’s probably clear that working with an Edge Coach is unlike anything else you’ve ever tried. Because of the additional check-ins in between sessions, working with your Edge Coach isn’t just a once-a-week thing: the interactions support you all week long.

Fees for an Edge Coach are $100* per week which includes the one on one coaching session which typically lasts 30 minutes and also includes text, email and phone follow ups during the week.

* Prior to the first week of coaching there is a one-time fee of $400 for an Intake Session of two hours.  It is the foundation session where in the student fleshes out to the coach who he/she is, where he’s/she’s been, what are his/her long term and short term goals, his/her strengths and weaknesses and what he/she wants to start working on.  The coach and the student create a plan and set up the weekly coaching sessions and the scheduled check-ins. .

Coaching progress happens over time, so consider this a month to month process toward success. It’s less than $15/day to get you back on track and give you the tools you need to succeed long term. Compare the above to some common (costly) things that definitely won’t help you succeed:

  • A daily Starbucks habit (sugar and caffeine are not the best way to stay alert–your Edge Coach can help you develop healthier habits);
  • A few bounced checks or credit card problems (your coach can help you manage your money and avoid these problems);
  • A speeding ticket or parking ticket or fender bender, and the increased insurance premiums that will result (your coach can help educate you about the issues  teens face when driving and encourage safe driving habits); and
  • Failing a class (there goes that tuition if you are in college! Your coach can help you stay on track so you won’t fail — you’ll do well.

How does the coach match-making process work?

Step 1:Contact Denise, our Coach Match Maker

You can reach her by calling (1-888-718-8886) or emailing (dvonpressentin@edgefoundation.org) or by submitting the form.

Step 2: Set up a call between the student/individual to be coached and Denise

Denise, our Coach Match Maker, based upon the discussion she has with the person to be coached, will identify the Edge Coach best suited to work with you and your particular situation.  And don’t worry, you’ll have a chance to get to know the coach and have all your questions answered before you start coaching or make any financial commitment.  The application form below should have been submitted by now.

Step 3:Meet your Edge Coach

After you’ve completed the application, and had your conversations (parent and student) with Denise, our Coach Match Maker, will provide you with a bio for your potential Edge Coach. Your Edge Coach will contact you to set up a time for an interview to determine if it is a good match, a good connection between the Edge Coach and you.  If, after speaking with the proposed Edge Coach, you want to speak with another coach, no problem.  Just contact Denise and she will suggest another Edge Coach.  The process will be repeated until a good match is made for you — one that you and the Edge Coach are excited about and comfortable with.

An Edge Coach suited to your needs and situation

After Denise has gathered all of the available information about what you are looking for, she’ll make a Coach match.  She’ll send you background information about an Edge Coach picked specially for you. You’ll also be provided her contact information.  Before you agree to working with an Edge Coach, you’ll have an opportunity to interview with him.  You’ll have a chance to get to know the person a bit and see if he feels comfortable.  If you think the match is a good fit, you’re done.  If you want to interview other coaches, Denise will help you with that.

We want to make it as painless as possible

Denise knows each one of our coaches well and strives to make it easy for you by making a good match for you the first time. Some people are overwhelmed by the idea of interviewing coaches and ask us to pick someone for them. We can do that.  Other people want to interview several coaches to get a better feel for the differences between them.  We can do that too. We have dozens of talented, well-trained, and experienced coaches for you to work with.  We are committed to finding an Edge Coach suited to your need and confident that you’ll find a good match at Edge.

How long do I need an Edge Coach?

The Edge program is designed to last for up to 36 weeks: one 30-minute session for every week of a nine month academic school year. Although the coaching contracts are month-to-month, we strongly encourage you to stay with coaching for two full school terms. The first term, you’re just learning the skills. The second term you’re learning how to apply them on your own with the support of your Edge Coach. By the end of the second term, most students have internalized what they’ve learned and are ready to graduate from coaching! If you want to keep coaching, however, your coach will be happy to work something out with you.

Most students choose to suspend Edge Coaching during exams and holidays, but we strongly encourage you not to go more than two weeks without a session or at least a check-in.

Why do Edge Coaches work by phone?

Although there is no prohibition against meeting in person, all of Edge Coaches are trained to work on the phone. We do this for several reasons:

Using the phone takes transportation issues right out of the equation. You can get to your appointment just by picking up the phone – it’s a lot easier to be on time for your appointments!

By working on the phone, you have access to the Edge Coach who is just right for you regardless of where you live or where the coach resides.   And, you can “take your coach with you” where ever you go.

A 30-minute appointment takes exactly 30 minutes. No commuting to and from the appointment, or waiting in the waiting room. Coaching appointments are therefore easy to fit into a busy schedule.

You and your Edge Coach can stay in much closer touch through the phone, text and email than you can if you’re only connected in an office. It is this extra contact that very often makes the difference in being able to stay on task and follow through.

You can also meet with your Edge Coach on Skype!

How long does the coaching last?

It varies with you and your needs.  Some last the full school year.  Some last for 6 months.  Some stop after 4 months.  Some continue on and off with their coach for several years, and even into their work-a-day world.   One of the great things about Edge Coaching is that you can turn it on when you need it and turn it off when you don’t. Even though we encourage a nine-month commitment for optimal results, you can just try it for a month and see if coaching works for you.

Does Edge Coaching happen during school exams and vacations?

It is your choice. Coaching may be suspended over exam periods, but oftentimes coaching support is most valuable during these busy, high stress times.  Most students suspend Edge Coaching during school vacations and holiday, but we strongly encourage you not to go more than two weeks without a session or at least a check-in. If you start coaching in the middle of the year, you may take the summer off and complete your second semester of coaching in the fall.

What is the difference between an organizational coach and an Edge Coach?

One of the questions recently raised on Facebook was what is the difference between organizational and Edge Coaching. Organizational and Edge Coaches do have a lot in common.  The best answer to this question comes in the form of a Tweet from professional organizer, Jeri Dansky: Coaching is coaching, but not all organizing challenges come from ADHD, and not all ADHD challenges are organizing. Yes, organizational issues are a hallmark of ADHD, however, there are many other executive functions that an Edge Coach also can help a person address including:

  • Scheduling
  • Goal Setting
  • Focusing
  • Prioritizing
  • Sticking with it when it gets tough (a.k.a. persistence)
  • Impulsiveness

An Edge Coach helps people with Executive Functioning challenges like ADHD build strategies to work with their strengths to counter their weaknesses. You can’t organize yourself into focusing or being less impulsive. But most people with ADHD do need help getting organized.

Who do Edge Coaches work with?

How old do you need to be to get an Edge Coach?

Coaching readiness is not based solely on chronological age.  However, most children under the age of 11 are not emotionally ready to take on the responsibility and accountability required in a coaching relationship.

Children in middle school and some in high school need to be coached in person.  Mature high school students and college students can be effectively coached by phone or Skype. For children under the age of 11, the most effective use of an Edge Coach is for the parents to get an Edge Coach. (See next question)

If you aren’t sure that your child is ready for an Edge Coach, you can take this short coaching readiness quiz to get a better idea of what’s required.

Does Edge work with parents?

Yes! Parents of kids with Executive Functioning challenges often face the same challenges their kids face.  An Edge Coach can help parents understand their children better, learn the benefits of using non directive questioning techniques in dealing with their children, establish structures, rules and boundaries to support their children who have Executive Functioning challenges.

Does Edge work with graduate students?

Yes!  While our primary focus is providing help to younger students so that they complete their education, the reality is that for those of us who have Executive Functioning challenges there is no age limit to learning to minimize the weaknesses that come with ADHD and other Executive Function impairments.

What if I’m not in school, will you still work with me?

Absolutely. You don’t have to be a student to use a coach. CEOs commonly use life coaches to help them be more effective at work and you can too!

Is this limited to young people?  I have a 29 year old son who could use this.

While our focus is on young people at risk of completing middle school, high school and college, there is no age limit for who can benefit from Edge Coaching.

Do I have to have a diagnosis of ADHD or something else to get an Edge Coach?

No. The only thing you need to work with an Edge Coach is a desire and willingness to work on Executive Functioning challenges such as prioritizing, goal setting, perseverance, time management, or impulsiveness.

What if I want to call upon my coach, who I had in middle school, when I get to college?

We encourage that.  Our dream is that you will have an Edge Coach for life.  Someone you can call upon whenever you need to reconnect with your coach for whatever reason.

What if I want to call upon my coach, who I had in college, when I get my first job?

See answer above.

Don’t Let ADHD or Learning Disabilities Stop You

How an ADHD Coach Helps

Do you struggle in school?

  • Do people tell you you’d do fine if you just tried harder?
  • Do you space out when people are explaining things to you?
  • Does it feel impossible to focus long enough to finish your homework?
  • Does it take you twice as long as the other kids to get anything done?
  • Are you the kid in class who gets in trouble for interrupting or doing random stuff?
  • Do you procrastinate?
  • Do you get anxious?
  • Do you sometimes just go blank when taking a test?
  • Do you sometimes feel like you’re always forgetting things, always late, always in trouble, always behind?

If this sounds like you, you’ve come to the right place! Although we talk a lot about ADD and ADHD at the Edge Foundation, we don’t care so much about labels and diagnoses. If these are the things you struggle with, an Edge Coach can make a big difference in your life.

What’s an Edge Coach?

An Edge Coach is someone trained to help people who have ADD, ADHD, or who are just ADD-ish, people who often struggle to stay organized and on top of things. An Edge Coach is not a doctor. He or she is more like a friend or teacher but isn’t those things either.

  • A coach is your advocate—a person who gets to know you and finds ways to help you succeed in your life.
  • You and your coach talk regularly and check in about how your life is going.
  • Your coach can help you find strategies to stay organized and remember important things.
  • Your coach can help remind you to take care of yourself and show you ways to stay focused.
  • Your coach can also help you improve the relationships in your life with friends, classmates, teachers, and family members.
  • Your coach is there to talk to, strategize with, and advocate for you as long as you want.

The Edge Foundation connects young people who have a hard time staying organized and on track, people like you, with personal coaches who can help them do just that. When you have your own coach, you’ve got an Edge!

Back to top…

Great Links to Follow to Learn More About Coaching and ADHD

ADHD Friendly Colleges

Sink or Swim?

Congratulations on being  ready for college! You are one of the lucky few – only 22% of high school students with ADHD go on to attend college. For most students with ADHD it’s been a long journey getting here and you are probably a little worried about cutting it in college.

  • Are you looking for a college environment that’s supportive of students with ADHD?
  • Are you worried what will happen when you leave the structure and accountability of high school and home?
  • Perhaps you’ve been swept up by the freewheeling life of college – and you know that having access to a tutoring center isn’t what you need to get back on track.

Read on!  You aren’t alone.

College is an exciting time, there are so many new opportunities and responsibilities. But when you have ADHD, and are totally in charge of making all of your own decisions for the first time – it can be a recipe for disaster.

In fact, research has shown that as few as 5% of ADHD students who enter college end up graduating. The Edge Foundation knows how to help ADHD students be successful and we have facilitated a two-year scientific study to prove* that our model works.

Find out today how Edge Foundation can help you succeed in college.

ADHD Students are “At Risk” Students

Students with ADHD are vulnerable because ADHD impacts the higher portion of the brain that regulates Executive Functioning. ADHD students usually have Executive Function deficits in attention, planning and organization, prioritization, impulse control, memory, time management, and higher-order conceptual thinking.

Executive Functioning levels are well known by researchers to be a an important part of academic success. Experts agree that successful students usually have four qualities that help them achieve their goals:

  1. Sticking with things even when the going gets tough (perseverance),
  2. Ability to delay gratification and focus on the big picture,
  3. Time management and organizational skills, and
  4. Striking the right balance between fun and work.

If you have weaknesses in at least one of these areas, you may be at risk to struggling with ADHD in college.

ADHD students don’t have to be “at risk” students.  An Edge Coach can help you learn the very skills you need to be successful in school.

Broaden Your Options

When you work with an Edge Coach, the options of where to go to school broaden. You no longer have to find a school that caters to ADHD because you can bring your support system with you!

An Edge Coach can help you:

  • Get better organized,
  • Achieve personal goals,
  • Effectively manage your time and,
  • Stick with things when the going gets rough.

Call us (1-888-718-8886) or sign up today to learn more about how Edge Foundation’s proven model can help you succeed in school.

Get Started Early

Students with ADHD shouldn’t have to fail before they get support.  Students and their families should think about getting started with a coach even before college begins. Many students find they have a rough first term. But for students with ADHD, it is surprisingly easy to fall behind, and poor, or even failing, first-term grades can be a devastating blow to self-esteem and confidence.

Or perhaps you’ve already experienced these challenges. It’s not too late to have an Edge coach help you get back on track. 

Our recently completed research* shows students who receive coaching have substantial gains in their overall approach to learning — in other words, they become more effective students!

Would you like to learn more about the techniques that research proves helps students succeed? There’s no obligation if you call us (1-888-718-8886) or sign up today to find out more about how ADHD coaching can make the difference between success and failure in school.

Choose Your School Carefully

If you still feel like you want to look into schools that are focused towards learning disabilities and ADHD, here are two references that can help you choose a school that will fit your needs. But remember, very few colleges and universities will offer personal coaching. The skills you need won’t be taught in the tutoring center or improved by using extended time when taking tests.

Coaching Helps Students Succeed

Edge Foundation’s research study offers hope for students with ADHD because it definitively links coaching to improved Executive Functioning. And improved Executive Functioning means more success in school.

ADHD students who participated in Edge coaching sessions demonstrated statistically significant, higher Executive Functioning than ADHD students who did not receive coaching. *

Coaching has long been used by the corporate world to improve performance of CEOs and executives, but little study had been done until now on the impact this particular kind of intervention has on those living with ADHD.

While medication can improve academic productivity (better note-taking, scores on quizzes and worksheets, and homework completion), medication alone is not associated with skills like being organized, time management, or the ability to apply knowledge, all of which are critical in a successful post secondary education.  Coaching will!

If you’re still on the fence about whether or not you need an Edge coach, today is the day to take the first step.  If you need a little more convincing before you sign up, why not download our free guide to college success?

FREE ADHD and College Success Guide

Yes! Please send me the…

Included in the guide are 60 practical solutions for typical ADHD challengesincluding:

  • Using creative ways, like music, to keep yourself on schedule,
  • Working with your urge to procrastinate, not against it,
  • How to study smarter, not harder,
  • How to use fidgeting to stay focused, and
  • 4 student qualities for success.

Sign up today to receive your copy. It’s free, jam-packed with tips and ideas you can start using today, and you are under no obligation to buy anything . What have you got to lose?

*The Edge Foundation is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization dedicated to helping students reach their academic, professional, and social potential through the support of personal coaching.  For more on our research study visit https://edgefoundation.org/information/research/.

Free Resources for ADHD

ADHD Friendly Colleges

Sink or Swim?

Congratulations on being  ready for college! You are one of the lucky few – only 22% of high school students with ADHD go on to attend college. For most students with ADHD it’s been a long journey getting here and you are probably a little worried about cutting it in college.

  • Are you looking for a college environment that’s supportive of students with ADHD?
  • Are you worried what will happen when you leave the structure and accountability of high school and home?
  • Perhaps you’ve been swept up by the freewheeling life of college – and you know that having access to a tutoring center isn’t what you need to get back on track.

Read on!  You aren’t alone.

College is an exciting time, there are so many new opportunities and responsibilities. But when you have ADHD, and are totally in charge of making all of your own decisions for the first time – it can be a recipe for disaster.

In fact, research has shown that as few as 5% of ADHD students who enter college end up graduating. The Edge Foundation knows how to help ADHD students be successful and we have facilitated a two-year scientific study to prove* that our model works.

Find out today how Edge Foundation can help you succeed in college.

ADHD Students are “At Risk” Students

Students with ADHD are vulnerable because ADHD impacts the higher portion of the brain that regulates Executive Functioning. ADHD students usually have Executive Function deficits in attention, planning and organization, prioritization, impulse control, memory, time management, and higher-order conceptual thinking.

Executive Functioning levels are well known by researchers to be a an important part of academic success. Experts agree that successful students usually have four qualities that help them achieve their goals:

  1. Sticking with things even when the going gets tough (perseverance),
  2. Ability to delay gratification and focus on the big picture,
  3. Time management and organizational skills, and
  4. Striking the right balance between fun and work.

If you have weaknesses in at least one of these areas, you may be at risk to struggling with ADHD in college.

ADHD students don’t have to be “at risk” students.  An Edge Coach can you learn the very skills you need to be successful in school.

Broaden Your Options

When you work with an Edge Coach, the options of where to go to school broaden. You no longer have to find a school that caters to ADHD because you can bring your support system with you!

An Edge Coach can help you:

  • Get better organized,
  • Achieve personal goals,
  • Effectively manage your time and,
  • Stick with things when the going gets rough.

Call us (1-888-718-8886) or sign up today to learn more about how Edge Foundation’s proven model can help you succeed in school.

Get Started Early

Students with ADHD shouldn’t have to fail before they get support.  Students and their families should think about getting started with a coach even before college begins. Many students find they have a rough first term. But for students with ADHD, it is surprisingly easy to fall behind, and poor, or even failing, first-term grades can be a devastating blow to self-esteem and confidence.

Or perhaps you’ve already experienced these challenges. It’s not too late to have an Edge coach help you get back on track. 

Our recently completed research* shows students who receive coaching have substantial gains in their overall approach to learning — in other words, they become more effective students!

Would you like to learn more about the techniques that research proves helps students succeed? There’s no obligation if you call us (1-888-718-8886) or sign up today to find out more about how ADHD coaching can make the difference between success and failure in school.

Choose Your School Carefully

If you still feel like you want to look into schools that are focused towards learning disabilities and ADHD, here are two references that can help you choose a school that will fit your needs. But remember, very few colleges and universities will offer personal coaching. The skills you need won’t be taught in the tutoring center or improved by using extended time when taking tests.

Coaching Helps Students Succeed

Edge Foundation’s research study offers hope for students with ADHD because it definitively links coaching to improved Executive Functioning. And improved Executive Functioning means more success in school.

ADHD students who participated in Edge coaching sessions demonstrated statistically significant, higher Executive Functioning than ADHD students who did not receive coaching. *

Coaching has long been used by the corporate world to improve performance of CEOs and executives, but little study had been done until now on the impact this particular kind of intervention has on those living with ADHD.

While medication can improve academic productivity (better note-taking, scores on quizzes and worksheets, and homework completion), medication alone is not associated with skills like being organized, time management, or the ability to apply knowledge, all of which are critical in a successful post secondary education.  Coaching will!

If you’re still on the fence about whether or not you need an Edge coach, today is the day to take the first step.  If you need a little more convincing before you sign up, why not download our free guide to college success?

FREE ADHD and College Success Guide

Yes! Please send me the…

Included in the guide are 60 practical solutions for typical ADHD challengesincluding:

  • Using creative ways, like music, to keep yourself on schedule,
  • Working with your urge to procrastinate, not against it,
  • How to study smarter, not harder,
  • How to use fidgeting to stay focused, and
  • 4 student qualities for success.

Sign up today to receive your copy. It’s free, jam-packed with tips and ideas you can start using today, and you are under no obligation to buy anything . What have you got to lose?

*The Edge Foundation is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization dedicated to helping students reach their academic, professional, and social potential through the support of personal coaching.  For more on our research study visit https://edgefoundation.org/information/research/.

Advice every parent of a new college student with ADHD needs to know

Advice every parent of a new college student with ADHD needs to know

There is a big shift in the relationship between parents and children when a child head off to college.  There are new worries for parents students who have ADHD when they live away at home and aren’t able to comfort their child in person. Even when your child is at home attending community college, she’ll need your support in moving into young adult level of self management.

We asked our coaches for advice to share with parents of new college students. Here are 6 ideas every parent of a new college student with ADHD should know.

  1. Maturity Levels: Teenagers and young adults have a chronological age, an intellectual age, and a social maturity age. These three are rarely the same.  With ADHD teens, often their intellectual age is years ahead of their chronological age, with the social maturity age three to five years, or more, behind the chronological age. It takes longer for these delightful and creative folks to reach a balanced level of social maturity. Remember the greatest gifts you can give your teen are unconditional love, understanding and patience.
  2. Staying Healthy: Support your child in establishing healthy habits away from home. For example, you may want to let her know that you would prefer she get at least 8 hours of sleep each night, even it means less study time. Or you would rather she exercise every day than get straight A’s.  Ask her what might get in the way of sleep or exercise, and come up with some strategies to protect those part of her life.  Sleep and exercise will do more than anything else can to keep your daughter (or son) happy, healthy and wise.
  3. Communicate: Set up guidelines for regular check-ins by text, phone, Skype or Facetime. Be clear about the kinds of things you want to hear about in advance (e.g., how classes are going, grades, new friends, roommates, sleep, eating, etc.). And be prepared to share news about things the college student wants to know (how the family cat is doing, what’s happening back at home, etc.). If college students are forthcoming about the things that parents want to know, it builds a relationship of trust, keeps the college student accountable to parents (and vice versa), and everyone can relax a lot more!
  4. Crisis Counseling: When your child calls you with a minor crisis, start by asking her what she thinks she should do.  Let her find her own way. Remind yourself that when she calls expressing sadness, worry, loneliness & homesickness, it is often cured by the first friend who knocks on the door. This is the time for your student to make their own choices and figure out how to bounce back from their own mistakes. Remember, parents are often still worried long after the child has gotten over it.
  5. Success Measures:  College success should not be assessed solely by an academic grade. Is your young adult developing self advocacy skills? Self awareness? Initiative? Connections? Look at everything she is learning, not just the grades she produces.
  6. Student Services: Encourage student to connect with student services and take advantage of all of their services!  They may need assistance in figuring out how to supply the proof they qualify for services. Guide them, but don’t do it for them.
  7. Prepare for grieving. Your child’s initial departure may be surprisingly harder for you than you thought it would be. Your emotions may feel similar to when he marched off with her class on first day of kindergarten.  The first couple of weeks can be a big adjustment for you.  Make sure you have others parents who are in the same boat to commiserate with over beverage or a meal.

>>Parents:  Do you have any advice you’d give to other parents of new college students?  We’d love to hear what has been helpful to you.