Are You Ready For College?

ready-for-college

ADHD 
and
 college: a
 challenge
 you
 can
 handle

Do 
you
 get
 an
 anxious 
feeling
 when
 you
 think
 about 
school? Going
 to
 college is
 an
adjustment
 for 
anyone,
 but
 when
 you
 have 
ADHD,
 the
 challenges 
are
 that
 much
 greater.
However, 
college
 is
 a
 challenge
 you
 can 
handle
 if
 you
 go
 armed 
with
 the
 knowledge 
of 
a 
few 
extra 
things you 
can
 do to 
make 
sure
 your
 college
 experience 
is
 everything
 you
 hope
 it
will
 be.

Do
 you
 have
 the
 4
 student
 qualities
 for
 success?

Successful
 students
 usually
 have
 four
 qualities
 that 
help
 them
 achieve
 their
 goals:

1. Sticking 
with
 things even
 when
 the
 going 
gets
 tough
 ( a.k.a.
 perseverance),

2. Ability
 to
 delay 
gratification
 and
 focus 
on
 the
 big 
picture,

3. Time 
management 
and
 organizational
 skills,
 and

4. Striking
 the
 right
 balance
 between
 fun 
and
 work.

Are
 you
 feeling
 discouraged
 already? No
 surprise. These
 particular skills
 don’t
 come
 easily
to
 students with 
ADHD. Organizational
 problems, 
impulsivity
 and
 time
 management
 issues 
are
 actually
 the
 hallmarks 
of 
living 
with 
ADHD. You
 think,
 “If 
I 
just
 get
 this
 special
 planner,
 I’ll 
never 
forget 
anything
 again.” Or 
you 
promise
 yourself,
 “Next 
time
 I’m
 going
to
 start 
working
 on
 my
 class
 reading
 at
 the
 beginning
 of
 the 
term
 instead
 of 
cramming
right
 before
 finals.” It’s
so
 easy
 to
 think,
“If
 I 
just 
make
 myself
 do
 this…
it’ll
 be
 fine.” 
But
what 
if
  we 
told
 you
 that 
making
 yourself 
do
 it 
is 
the 
totally  wrong 
approach?

Read more at: Your guide for college success

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Getting organized: learning what works

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Getting organized: learning what works

Do you ever feel the urge to get organized at the end of the year? You aren’t alone. Just watch the seasonal items section of your local discount store in January where all types of containers and organizing systems will be featured.

You may have bought systems in the past, only to find they fell to the wayside. Professional Organizer, Judith Kolberg, offers an insight into why that may be the case:

Organizing, like reading, is a learned activity. Usually, we have a dominant learning style. The problem for people who are chronically disorganized is the organizing methods they are using are often not in concert with their learning style. For instance, if you’re a strong visual learner you can easily imagine the way you want a room organized in your ‘mind’s eye’, and you can mentally conjure up images of where you put things. But if you’re taking notes from a decorator, listening to verbal instruction or trying to use a filing index, those may not be your strengths.

Assess your learning style

Judith recommends checking out the learning style assessment provided by Ageless Learner.  Then when you are planning your new system, keep in mind what type of learner you are. If you are a visual person, draw a picture of what you want your room or desk to look like. Make space for visual reminders of what you need to get done. Put things in clear containers so you can see where they are.

Get support while breaking in your new system

And don’t get discouraged. An ADHD coach can help you figure out what type of organizational system will work for you. And, more importantly, help you practice using it until it’s an ingrained habit that lasts beyond the thrill of setting up a new system.

Have you ever considered your learning style’s impact on how to get organized?

Like this article? Check out Getting Organized ADHD Style