Are You Ready For College?

ready-for-college

ADHD 
and
 college: a
 challenge
 you
 can
 handle

Do 
you
 get
 an
 anxious 
feeling
 when
 you
 think
 about 
school? Going
 to
 college is
 an
adjustment
 for 
anyone,
 but
 when
 you
 have 
ADHD,
 the
 challenges 
are
 that
 much
 greater.
However, 
college
 is
 a
 challenge
 you
 can 
handle
 if
 you
 go
 armed 
with
 the
 knowledge 
of 
a 
few 
extra 
things you 
can
 do to 
make 
sure
 your
 college
 experience 
is
 everything
 you
 hope
 it
will
 be.

Do
 you
 have
 the
 4
 student
 qualities
 for
 success?

Successful
 students
 usually
 have
 four
 qualities
 that 
help
 them
 achieve
 their
 goals:

1. Sticking 
with
 things even
 when
 the
 going 
gets
 tough
 ( a.k.a.
 perseverance),

2. Ability
 to
 delay 
gratification
 and
 focus 
on
 the
 big 
picture,

3. Time 
management 
and
 organizational
 skills,
 and

4. Striking
 the
 right
 balance
 between
 fun 
and
 work.

Are
 you
 feeling
 discouraged
 already? No
 surprise. These
 particular skills
 don’t
 come
 easily
to
 students with 
ADHD. Organizational
 problems, 
impulsivity
 and
 time
 management
 issues 
are
 actually
 the
 hallmarks 
of 
living 
with 
ADHD. You
 think,
 “If 
I 
just
 get
 this
 special
 planner,
 I’ll 
never 
forget 
anything
 again.” Or 
you 
promise
 yourself,
 “Next 
time
 I’m
 going
to
 start 
working
 on
 my
 class
 reading
 at
 the
 beginning
 of
 the 
term
 instead
 of 
cramming
right
 before
 finals.” It’s
so
 easy
 to
 think,
“If
 I 
just 
make
 myself
 do
 this…
it’ll
 be
 fine.” 
But
what 
if
  we 
told
 you
 that 
making
 yourself 
do
 it 
is 
the 
totally  wrong 
approach?

Read more at: Your guide for college success

Scholarships for college students with ADHD

iStock_45005750_XXXLARGE v3Financial scholarships for college students are wonderful, but they don’t ensure successful completion and graduation. That’s why we provide Edge Coaches to support scholarship recipients as a form of scholarship insurance.

The Shire Scholarship Program

Since 2011, the Edge Foundation has partnered with Shire PLC who provides scholarships for college students with ADHD. Shire U.S., Inc. funds the Michael Yasick ADHD Scholarship program, which is for residents of the United States who are under the care of a licensed health care professional for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and have been accepted to or enrolled in undergraduate programs at accredited colleges, universities, trade schools, technical schools, or vocational schools located in the US.

The Michael Yasick ADHD Scholarship awards recipients in the U.S. $2,000 in tuition assistance and one year of ADHD coaching services provided by the Edge Foundation to assist in meeting the challenges of higher education. A similar program, operated by Shire Canada offers Canadian students $1,500 in tuition assistance and one year of ADHD coaching services provided by the Edge Foundation. In May 2016, fifty-five scholarships were awarded in the U.S. and six scholarships were awarded in Canada..

The scholarship application process for 2017 opens in December, 2016, and the application process closes in March, 2017. To learn more about the Shire Scholarship program or for help with the application process, contact:

Denise von Pressentin
888.718.8886
206.632.9497
dvonpressentin@edgefoundation.org

 

Sign Up for Scholarship Support

If you are an organization, institution or individual who provides financial  scholarships to college students, and are interested in providing funds for Edge Coaches to support those students, please contact:

Neil Peterson
Founder, Chairman, and CEO
206.910.7515
npeterson@edgefoundation.org

What If? – I have ADHD but I don’t let it stand in my way

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1

That phrase, spoken more than fifteen years ago by my then-ten-year-old son, still brings tears to my eyes. He wrote this to his teacher on the first day of fifth grade. She had given him a “get to know you questionnaire.” This was his answer to her final question, which asked the students if there was anything else she should know about them.

If only we could freeze those moments. I would love to say that he continues to feel that way all the time but that is not our reality. Having children with ADHD and other executive function-challenges can be compared to life on a roller coaster. As a retired teacher, guidance counselor, and now an ADHD/EF coach, I feel that my experiences have prepared me for the next stage of parenting. But it is not easy. I have come to realize that it’s a marathon not a sprint.

Most parents, after their child is diagnosed, feel that they need to solve the problem. They want to help their children overcome their disability and protect them from the world.   Frequently, we feel that we did something wrong, that we must fix the situation or find a magical answer. I was no exception. After researching this topic for many years and filling several rooms with books on ADHD, EF and positive psychology, I have come to the realization that the best gift we can give is to accept them for who they are.

We do not need to give up future plans for our children but we do need to accept them as they exist. We can be aware of their weaknesses and help them develop their strengths. As parents, we need to help them recognize that as they approach life differently, they can achieve their goals.

Those diagnosed with ADHD and EF challenges must learn to adapt to our competitive society and to appreciate themselves. We also must help professionals, family members and others to refrain from squeezing our square pegs into round holes. What if, instead, we delighted in their differences? As their parents and coaches, we have the power to concentrate on their strengths, provide support when needed, and most importantly, not allow them to use their diagnosis as a crutch.

If these children are brought up to recognize their gifts, just imagine what they could accomplish. If we help them recognize their situation as an opportunity to develop strategies that will allow them succeed, they will become stronger and more adaptable.

I can only imagine the number of negative verbal and non-verbal messages that these individuals receive on a daily basis. What if they could depend on their families to be supportive and their homes to be an oasis of positive reinforcement? What if they could trust our verbal and non-verbal communication would instill a sense of well being, rather than a source of shame and inadequacy?

What if we were able to accept the fact that we, as parents, do not have the power to fix our children or find a magic answer?

What if we concentrated on what we can control, and helped our children realize that they are creative, resourceful and whole? What if we helped them recognize that life is not black or white? What if we helped our children realize that because of their differences, not in spite of them, they have much to offer?

What if every individual diagnosed with ADHD and executive-functioning challenges could say: “I have ADHD but I don’t let it stand in my way.”

Written by: Cheryl Breining, LMSW, M.Ed, MS, ACC, CPCC, Edge Coach, Certified Life and Parenting Coach, The Life Coaching Corner Inc., Contact her at www.thelifecoachingcorner.com.

 

What If? – I have ADHD but I don’t let it stand in my way

quotes-inspirational-motivational-quotes-self-improvement-success-faith-belief-courage-quotes-hard-work-happiness-joy-faith-courage-belief-my-perfect-line-5

That phrase, spoken more than fifteen years ago by my then-ten-year-old son, still brings tears to my eyes. He wrote this to his teacher on the first day of fifth grade. She had given him a “get to know you questionnaire.” This was his answer to her final question, which asked the students if there was anything else she should know about them.

If only we could freeze those moments. I would love to say that he continues to feel that way all the time but that is not our reality. Having children with ADHD and other executive function-challenges can be compared to life on a roller coaster. As a retired teacher, guidance counselor, and now an ADHD/EF coach, I feel that my experiences have prepared me for the next stage of parenting. But it is not easy. I have come to realize that it’s a marathon not a sprint.

Most parents, after their child is diagnosed, feel that they need to solve the problem. They want to help their children overcome their disability and protect them from the world.   Frequently, we feel that we did something wrong, that we must fix the situation or find a magical answer. I was no exception. After researching this topic for many years and filling several rooms with books on ADHD, EF and positive psychology, I have come to the realization that the best gift we can give is to accept them for who they are.

We do not need to give up future plans for our children but we do need to accept them as they exist. We can be aware of their weaknesses and help them develop their strengths. As parents, we need to help them recognize that as they approach life differently, they can achieve their goals.

Those diagnosed with ADHD and EF challenges must learn to adapt to our competitive society and to appreciate themselves. We also must help professionals, family members and others to refrain from squeezing our square pegs into round holes. What if, instead, we delighted in their differences? As their parents and coaches, we have the power to concentrate on their strengths, provide support when needed, and most importantly, not allow them to use their diagnosis as a crutch.

If these children are brought up to recognize their gifts, just imagine what they could accomplish. If we help them recognize their situation as an opportunity to develop strategies that will allow them succeed, they will become stronger and more adaptable.

I can only imagine the number of negative verbal and non-verbal messages that these individuals receive on a daily basis. What if they could depend on their families to be supportive and their homes to be an oasis of positive reinforcement? What if they could trust our verbal and non-verbal communication would instill a sense of well being, rather than a source of shame and inadequacy?

What if we were able to accept the fact that we, as parents, do not have the power to fix our children or find a magic answer?

What if we concentrated on what we can control, and helped our children realize that they are creative, resourceful and whole? What if we helped them recognize that life is not black or white? What if we helped our children realize that because of their differences, not in spite of them, they have much to offer?

What if every individual diagnosed with ADHD and executive-functioning challenges could say: “I have ADHD but I don’t let it stand in my way.”

Written by: Cheryl Breining, LMSW, M.Ed, MS, ACC, CPCC, Edge Coach, Certified Life and Parenting Coach, The Life Coaching Corner Inc., Contact her atwww.thelifecoachingcorner.com.

“Behind The Wheel With ADHD”

Edge Foundation is excited to be able to bring you a new training webinar program called “Behind the Wheel With ADHD”, created and developed by Gayle Sweeney and Ann Shanahan. This program was originally designed for driver education professionals and modified for this webinar to allow parents, coaches, and other professionals working with novice teen drivers who struggle with ADHD and other executive functioning challenges to gain from their expertise and knowledge. Gayle and Ann want to bring this information to those in the Edge community who are interested in helping create an enhanced driver training experience for their teens or clients or loved ones.

What is “Behind The Wheel With ADHD”?

Have you heard the studies that show that teen drivers with ADHD are four times more likely to be in a car accident than their peers who do not struggle with executive-function impairments?

Would you appreciate some guidance from the experts on training and coaching teens with ADHD? If so then this program may be one way to help your students mitigate those risks and improve the likelihood of a successful training experience for your teens who struggle with attention deficits and learning challenges.

Human factors are considered to be the most common cause of automobile accidents with in-vehicle distraction identified as a significant contributor to traffic collisions. Any disorder that impairs attention elevates the risk for crashes and other serious incidents on the road. Automobile accidents are more common among those with ADHD and are usually associated with a higher rate of fatality. . Compared to other teens, young drivers with ADHD are two to four times more likely to have traffic accidents, three times as likely to have injuries, four times as likely to be at fault, and six to eight times more likely to have their licenses suspended. Many of the symptoms associated with ADHD are known to magnify driving risks, especially impulsivity, distractibility, inattention, excessive anger, aggression, and risky maneuvers.

What Does “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Offer?

“Behind the Wheel with ADHD” gives you the tools necessary to coach your ADHD teens in creating effective strategies and skills to manage the risks associated with all executive functioning challenges and driving:

• Learn how to implement specific strategies to create a safer trip on the road for the teenage driver with attention deficits or other executive functioning challenges.

• Leave the training with a new set of tools to support the teen driver as he or she learns to drive and manage distractions, impulsivity, and other impediments to safe driving.

• Benefit from the research done on how drivers with ADHD and other executive functioning challenges can create a set of routines that eliminate many of the risky behaviors associated with ADHD and driving.

• Use the tools necessary to start a Graduated License Plan immediately for the new driver based on the prototype developed by Dr. Russell Barkley as well as templates for one’s own enhanced Driver Log, Parent-Teen Agreement, and information about the new app available for iPhones and Androids for the recommended Pre-Trip Inspection for drivers who struggle with executive functioning challenges.

• Learn the impact medication has on the effectiveness of a teen’s driving and some specific ways one can help him or her manage the medication protocol to mitigate risks.

When is “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Offered?

Webinar Dates: Two Wednesdays in September:
September 23: Noon- 1:30 pm Pacific; 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm Eastern
September 30: 4:00 pm- 5:30 pm Pacific; 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm Eastern

What does “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Cost?

Fee: US $75 for 90 minute webinar, use the button below to pay and register.

Choose a date
September 23rd 
September 30th 
Enter your phone number

How to Sign up for “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Webinar?

To Sign Up: https://edgefoundation.org/parents/webinars.
Questions: Contact Denise von Pressentin at Edge Foundation at 206.632.9497 or at dvonpressentin@edgefoundation.org.

Who are the “Behind the Wheel with ADHD” Trainers?

Gayle Sweeney and Ann Shanahan are ADHD and Executive Functioning Coaches who specialize in working with teens, college students, and young adults who have ADHD and other executive functioning issues to help them set goals and create strategies to achieve them. . As co-creators and authors of the new program “Behind the Wheel With ADHD”, Gayle and Ann hope to share their passion for helping people focus on specific strengths and weaknesses in a remarkably tailored driver education experience.

tn(1)Gayle Sweeney is a graduate from Marquette University in Business and trained at with JST Coach Training, LLC, and received training in the Coach Mentor Training Program and earned a Certificate for Advanced Coaching Skills Practicum. Gayle enjoyed a successful career in commercial real estate in Chicago with CB Commercial (now CB Richard Ellis) and then chose to stay home to raise her four children before embarking on a coaching career.

ann-sAnn Shanahan is a graduate in Psychology and Education from North Central College. She began her career as a UPS driver and was quickly was promoted into the management ranks becoming one of the first female Managers of the brown package car drivers in the North Illinois neighborhood districts. She became the North Illinois Safety Manager, responsible for the UPS training and development fleet of drivers. She has two children in college.

Gayle and Ann were trained and certified in 2014 in the Rush Neurobehavioral Center Executive Function Skills Program© taught by Rush University Medical Center. Gayle and Ann presented “Special Risks Associated with the ADHD Driver” to the Illinois Driver Educators Association (IDEA), November 2013.

To learn more about Gayle and Ann’s ADHD coaching practice, visit their website: www.BehindtheWheelWithADHD.com

behind-the-wheel-logo

The Edge Path

Traveling down the educational paths of high school and college are quite challenging with ADHD. If you need a guide to help you navigate the paths safely and efficiently than Edge Foundation’s ADHD Coaches are the guides you seek. Let … Continue reading